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GD’s Most Dominating Albums Of The 1990’s (50-41)

GD’s Most Dominating Albums Of The 1990’s (50-41)

07/04/07  ||  Global Domination

Bathory: Hammerheart 50. Bathory: Hammerheart

Released: 1990

I wish I knew if Quorthon was aware that he was going to create a
milestone with this album. I think he was, and the burden he carried on
his shoulders was successfully transformed into “Hammerheart”, an album
that has inspired millions and will do the same for the next 100 years.
It’s sad that the guy died and therefore his music came to an end, but
there’s plenty of stuff he left behind. Bathory is dead and buried but
won’t be forgotten.

-Rafal

[Full Review]


Darkthrone: A Blaze in the Northern Sky 49. Darkthrone: A Blaze in the Northern Sky

Released: 1992

After recording a classic old school death metal album in “Soulside
Journey”, Darkthrone threw their weight into the burgeoning Norwegian
black metal scene with their sophomore release, “A Blaze in the Northern
Sky”. Ever since the release of “Blaze”, which set the pace that the
band was to maintain thereafter, Darkthrone has been one of the most
influential titans practicing the “kvlt” style of black metal. “Blaze”
is a stripped-down, lo-fi, nasty, and downright vicious album. However,
it features a smattering of punkish sensibilities which makes the album
somewhat catchy in certain places, in spite of the conscious effort made
by the band to make the album an almost wholly harsh listening
experience. This punkish element gives the album a certain vital energy
which would be missing in many of the band’s later albums. Some devout
kvltists prefer the even more stripped-down albums which followed
“Blaze”, but the influence of Darkthrone’s first foray into black metal
in setting the standard for the whole “kvlt” black metal scene is
undeniable.

-Consumer

[Full Reivew]


Nevermore: Dreaming Neon Black 48. Nevermore: Dreaming Neon Black

Released: 1999

Frustration, depression, sadness, pain, etc. – no band can capture
these feelings perfectly and create music based on them. No one except
Nevermore. The year 1999 brought us an excellent slab of melancholic
metal which contained so much darkness and malice that it poured out of
every tune. The story and lyrics about Warrel Dane’s long lost
girlfriend might just send shivers down your spine; the song has the
ability to melt the heart of the toughest man. A very, very atmospheric
release, well worth the cult status it has been given.

-Rafal


Fear Factory: Demanufacture 47. Fear Factory: Demanufacture

Released: 1995

I’m really surprised that this album is as low as it is on this
list. It isn’t very often that an album comes out with the amount of
innovation and influence that “Demanufacture had”. Sure, Napalm Death
and Godflesh had a similar sound at the time, but none had the melodic
breaks, the production, or the “click into the bass drum” stylings of
Dino’s guitar riffs.

-Chazz

[Full Reivew]


Alice in Chains: Dirt 46. Alice in Chains: Dirt

Released: 1992

Though typically lumped in with its Northwest contemporaries, “Dirt”
is heavier, uglier and dirtier than anything put out by the big three
of grunge (Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Soundgarden). In their most basic
state Alice in Chains is Black Sabbath clad in flannel and hailing from
Seattle. Jerry Cantrell and Layne Staley’s riffs are simple, slow, heavy
and catchy and the lyrics deal with addiction to, you guessed it,
heroin. Although the basic formula is the same, “Dirt” looks at
Sabbath-doom through a wholly different lens, one that’s caked with the
desperate despondency of the early 90’s. The production is gritty and
covered in mud, the time signatures are off-kilter enough to be
unsettling and Staley’s raw, powerful croon is memorable for its urgent
indifference. The biggest difference between the bands is that Sabbath’s
music was meant to be scary-fun and dealt with the highs and the lows,
while AiC focuses almost exclusively on the lows. The tenth track “Iron
Guts” is a 40-second parody of the Sabbath’s all-time classic “Iron Man”
and completes the circle.

I’d be remiss not to mention how closely the concept of “Dirt”
mirrors Layne Staley’s life. Remember kids: Use drugs occasionally to
augment your creative impulse, but just say no to OD’ing on speedballs alone in a messy apartment.

-Stephen Fallen

[Full Review]


Gorefest: False 45. Gorefest: False

Released: 1992

Gorefest were considered a by-the-dozen death metal band with their
“Mindloss” debut. Then something happened and all shit broke loose: they
recorded “False”, and I was completely blown away. The progression from
“Mindloss” to this one is on par with Peter Forsberg’s famous goal in
the Lillehammer Olympics. Full of excellent death metal hits and with a
production that blows you away, Gorefest really put out one awesome
record. “False” also includes one of the finest moments in death metal
drumming, courtesy of Ed Warby.

-Lord K

[Full Review]


Cannibal Corpse: Tomb of the Mutilated 44. Cannibal Corpse: Tomb of the Mutilated

Released: 1992

One could argue that Cannibal Corpse has always been the
poster-child for gory/violent death metal, therefore serving as a base
for comparison for any group judged too generic and dull, whether
musically or lyrically. “Oh, I hate all these Cannibal Corpse
br00tal bands. They suck! Now Egbert, pass me my guitar, throw gasoline
on me and light me on fire as I unleash a fiendish solo forged from the
fiery pits of my mother’s basement!”
would be the words of some 32
year old douche in a Spiral Architect T-Shirt. Sadly, the point these
virgins are missing is that circa 1993, Chris Barnes and The Corpse were
running thangs. Few other bands have had such a significant impact on
the extreme metal scene, let alone pushing the boundaries of brutality
beyond what were previously unfeasible limits.

First of all, there’s “Hammer Smashed Face”. A death metal hit song.
Now that’s a fucking oxymoron if I’ve ever heard one. And there’s more.
Much more. Few vocalists have ever managed to let their growls sink as
deep as Barnes’ did on “Tomb”. The only thing on this album dipping
lower was the level of morality presented in Chris’ lyrics. In 1993, the
unfathomable depths of political correctness seemed bottomless. Just
assume that “Necropedophile” is a slightly cynical yet astute metaphor
for the true nature of today’s society of consumerism and corporate
greed and how it touches our young ones. It’s ok, they’re already dead inside… says the CEO.
Right. Anyhow, the main point is that Cannibal Corpse delivered one of
the finest albums in death metal at the time, and arguably the best of
their career. Heaviness, intensity, uncompromising brutality and sheer
repulsion. The indubitable key to success my friends (just ask any
successful CEO you might know)…

-Fishermane


Obituary: Cause of Death 43. Obituary: Cause of Death

Released: 1990

Obituary is one of those “love ‘em or hate ‘em” type of bands.
Those that love them, really worship this album and in my opinion, it’s
their best. My only complaint is that the production is kind of shitty
but considering its age, that complaint will remain minor. I think they
should get James Murphy back for an album or two, he seems to make the
band better for some reason. “Chopped in Half” is simply one of the best
songs, ever.

-Chazz

[Full Review]


Behemoth: Satanica 42. Behemoth: Satanica

Released: 1999

Behemoth’s significant breakthrough album. They had released several
black-metallish albums before “Satanica”, but it was actually this
particular album which presented Behemoth as a solid metal band. They
gave up running around the woods with poorly done corpse-painting and
gathered up a handful of memorable killer-riffs that made other bands
jealous. It’s not particularly enjoyable to be run over by a tank, but
that’s exactly what this album does to everyone. It couldn’t have been
done any better.

-Rafal

[Full Review]


Korn: Korn 41. Korn: Korn

Released: 1994

When Korn initially recorded their first demo “Neidermeyer’s Mind”
back in 1993, it must’ve been extremely hard for them to imagine just
how important and influential a band they would become. Almost 15 years
later and more than 25 million albums sold worldwide, Korn have managed
to make quite a successful career out of writing diatribes about social
alienation, the exploitive music industry and the joys of everyday life
in general. In retrospect, while their self-titled 94 debut might not
have matched the commercial success of their later albums, it is
arguably their most solid release overall. Vocalist Jonathan Davis
really let all his inner feelings and emotions spill out, to the point
where he actually breaks down and starts sobbing during the closer
“Daddy” (which according to dubious sources, is the the only song they
refuse to play live anymore).

To be honest, a significant amount of listeners might sustain cold
feet while indulging in this album, especially due to the somewhat
typical chugga-chug riffs and “jump-the-fuck-up”
choruses. However, do take into consideration the fact that these tracks
were written light years before euphemisms like “Nu-Metal” &
“Metalcore” were even remotely close to conception. Thus, even though
Korn deserve a smack in the mouth for contributing to spawn genres that
would eventually become the bane of modern metal, they deserve some
amount of respect for being on top of their game and ahead of their
time.

-Fishermane

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This entry was posted on June 14, 2014 by in 1990s - Top 100, Best of, Decades, Lists of Domination.
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